Bhut Jolokia

Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
Bhut Jolokia, Assam
   

Bhut Jolokia, a variety of chile pepper originating in Assam, India, has earned Guiness World Records recognition as the world's hottest chile pepper by blasting past the previous champion Red Savina. This specific type of chili is also found in the states of Nagaland and Manipur as well. The scientific name of this chili is Capsicum Chinese Jacq. and it is also known as Borbih jolokia, Naga jolokia, Nagahari, Naga Morich, Raja mirchi, Dorset naga, and ghost chili and king cobra chili. There has been a debate regarding Bhut jolokia about the breed of this chili. Some experts claimed that this breed belongs to the Capsicum frutescens family while some experts were of the opinion that the chili is of Capsicum Chinese breed. Recent DNA tests conducted on Bhut jolokia has confirmed that this chili is an interspecies hybrid nature with most properties of Capsicum Chinese and some genes of Capsicum frutescens.

There is one interesting observation regarding the pungency level of bhut jolokia that has come to the forefront from an Indian study that was conducted in 2005. That is the level of pungency in this breed of chili highly depends on the environment on which it is grown. 

In 2009, scientists at India's Defence Research and Development Organisation announced plans to use the peppers in hand grenades, as a non lethal way to flush out terrorists from their hideouts and to control rioters. It will also be developed into pepper spray as a self defense product. R. B. Srivastava, the director of the Life Sciences Department at the New Delhi headquarters of India's Defence Research and Development Organisation, said bhut jolokia-based aerosol sprays could be used by women as a "safety device", and "civial variants" of chili grenades could be used to control and disperse mobs.

Bhut Jolokia is used as a food and a spice as well as a remedy to summer heat, presumably by inducing perspiration in the consumer. In northeastern India, the peppers are smeared on fences or incorporated in smoke bombs as a safety precaution to keep wild elephants at a distance.

 

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